Another Dorktown project from Jon Bois (Editor) and Alex Rubenstein (Producer) over at sports website SB Nation have taken on the daunting task of chronicling the history of one of professional sports most miserable franchises -- the Seattle Mariners.
Why?

According to the two, either of whom are Mariners fans themselves, the Seattle club is a "fascinating, outrageously weird franchise, starting all the way back with its bizarre origins."

Three episodes of the six-part three hour doc have already been posted on the SB Nation YouTube channel. Even the most dyed-in-the-wool Mariners fan will learn things they never knew about the team (a serial arsonist from 1932 is why there is a baseball stadium in Seattle today!) and be reminded of extreme examples of ineptness (Lenny Randle getting on all fours to blow a ball into foul territory!) that have plagued the M's since their inception.
Episode I: "This Is Not An Endorsement of Arson"
A serial arsonist in 1932 is why a Major League stadium is still in Seattle? MLB's first ever 9-2-7-2 double play? And who is "Mr. Jello" and "Jello-gate"?


Episode II: "Ken Griffey, Jr. and His Quest to Save the Mariners"
"After years of abject irrelevance, the Seattle Mariners suddenly became the team of Ken Griffey Jr., one of the most beloved athletes in American history. The Toilet Years were over. The era of anonymous cellar-dwelling had ended. Now, they found themselves in the fight of their lives, battling the California Angels in one of the most dramatic playoff races in baseball history."


Episode III: "The Battle for Seattle"

"After nearly 20 years of losing baseball, the Seattle Mariners were likely to be sold and moved out of town. But on the field, they and the Yankees were playing out one of the most dramatic playoff series baseball has ever seen."

Episode IV: "The Seattle Mariners Build a Death Star"

"The late-‘90s Seattle Mariners were like nothing we’ve seen before or since. This was a team that had featured four Hall of Fame-caliber players – Ken Griffey Jr., Edgar Martinez, Randy Johnson, and Alex Rodriguez – in their primes. What could go wrong?"