BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson and Monique Lamoureux-Morando, stars of the United States' gold medal-winning hockey team in South Korea, are hard at work training to make another Olympic team in 2022. But they're also carving out time to do good off the ice, launching a foundation Monday that seeks to help underserved children and communities.

The Monique and Jocelyne Lamoureux Foundation will work with groups that support disadvantaged children through education and extracurricular activities, primarily in their home state of North Dakota. It's an extension of the sisters' hockey camps for girls and their work with cable and internet provider Comcast, where the twins promote such things as gender equity and internet access for low-income families.

"Sometimes there's a lack of awareness around the need that the kids need, and so we're hoping that we're able to inspire more people to give back," Lamoureux-Davidson said.

"We want to be part of bringing a solution around issues," Lamoureux-Morando said.

The 30-year-old Grand Forks natives and University of North Dakota standouts helped the U.S. win the gold medal in South Korea in 2018. Lamoureux-Morando scored the game-tying goal late in the third period of the gold-medal game against Canada, and her sister scored the game-winner in the shootout.

The twins are the first gold medalists from North Dakota, and they are training six days a week on the ice to try to earn a spot on a fourth Olympic team in Beijing in 2022. Each gave birth to a baby boy less than a year after the Olympics, and the women's children will accompany them at a USA Hockey camp next month in Lake Placid, New York.

"It's a total game-changer being a parent," Lamoureux-Morando said.

The twins said their mother, Linda, was a champion of the underdog, and taught them a lesson they have come to realize goes beyond the rink. And it has become the heart of their foundation aimed at helping the disadvantaged.

"She would always just cheer for the one that's behind," Lamoureux-Davidson said of her mother. "In hindsight, it was meant for sport, but it's really has really turned into something so much more for us."