When you think of high school football teams, do you think of astroturf, pigskin balls, knee pads and helmets, and good old-fashioned hydrogen peroxide?

Yes, I said hydrogen peroxide.

CBS News 11 reports that Celina's high school is pulling out all the stops to disinfect their legendary football stadium grounds, doing whatever they suspect it will take to keep the coronavirus germs away.

I don't blame the school one bit for trying to kill some germs with a little bit of the scientific element H3. In fact, I use hydrogen peroxide for a bit of everything in my house, whether it's disinfecting my kitten's oozy eye or rubbing a little bit the bubbly disinfectant on my daughter's scrapes and scratches from playing outdoors. There's even an old wives' tale that says pour a little bit of hydrogen peroxide in your ears every now and then to keep the earwax under control. (My daddy used to do that to me when I was a kid.)

The principal at Celina High, Dave Wilson, and his athletic staff at Celina High School aren't playing around with the idea of any more of their players catching the coronavirus, especially since one of their students came down with it earlier this year.

The school administration located a company that uses a special astroturf treatment that costs them close to one thousand dollars a WEEK to spray all over the field. The company that was hired to cleanse the field, Oxy Turf, says the chemical mixture they use on the high school grounds is the same one they used in the past to stave off infections from other nasty stuff like MRSA and E coli. Why wouldn't it work on COVID-19, the school wondered. They are not taking any chances. The Oxy Turf website says their formula is "Artificial Grass Cleaner...An EPA Registered Disinfectant Formula with Hydrogen Peroxide."

The high school football team has been practicing since the summer, so I bet that the disinfectant bill is mighty high.

Do you think this hydrogen peroxide method could work here in Washington state?