WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is conducting a fact-finding mission into the loosely regulated world of fantasy sports games — a multibillion-dollar business that seemingly advertised everywhere during the pro football season.

Lawmakers at a House hearing Wednesday are exploring whether safeguards are needed to protect players in daily fantasy leagues. Most players ending up losing at the hands of better-informed players who often have a technological edge.

States are beginning to enact laws regulating the industry and its dominant companies, DraftKings and FanDuel.

Fantasy sports games involve choosing an imaginary roster of players from different teams, accumulating a score based on the players' performances, and matching up against one or more opponents.